Welcome To The Irish Channel St. Patrick’s Day Club

The Irish Channel St. Patrick’s Day Committee was organized in the Irish Channel in 1947. The current president of the organization is Richard (Dick) Burke, Jr. (son and nephew of two of the organizers; Dick and Paul Burke).

Despite the years of decline and change in the “Channel,” the organization has survived and this year, plans to parade with the largest membership ever (fourteen hundred plus). The organization credits its survival to their deep, strong roots. While the top root is Irish Heritage, many of it’s members feel an even stronger bond, just being from or associated with, the Irish Channel. Most people are aware of the pre-parade mass, followed by the parade up Magazine Street with hundreds of men in formal attire.

This years parade day is Saturday, March 13, 2021

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Calendar of Events

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    COUNTY ANTRIMCOUNTY ANTRIM

    Antrim is a town and civil parish in County Antrim in the northeast of Northern Ireland, on the banks of the Six Mile Water, on the north shore of Lough Neagh. It is the county town of County Antrim and was the administrative centre of Antrim Borough Council. It is 22 miles northwest of Belfast by rail.

    According to tradition, a monastery was founded at Antrim in AD 495, thirty years after the death of Saint Patrick, to take forward his ministry, with a small settlement growing up around it. The round tower (see below), also known as "the Steeple", is all that remains. In the Middle Ages, the area was part of the Gaelic territory of Dál Araide which covered much of what is now County Antrim. At the eastern edge of town is a ringfort called Rathmore (Ráth Mór, "the great fort"), which was the royal residence of the kings of Dál Araide.

    By 1596, an English settlement had grown up around a ford across the Sixmilewater River. The All Saints Parish Church has a datestone of 1596 with the words 'Gall-Antrum' carved on it – this could be translated as 'The Antrum of the English/foreigner'. Hugh Clotworthy, father of the Anglo-Irish politician John Clotworthy, 1st Viscount Massereene, supervised the building of secure military quarters beside the old Norman motte. This later became the site of Antrim Castle. Hugh was knighted in 1617 and appointed High Sheriff of County Antrim.
    A battle was fought near Antrim between the English and Irish in the reign of Edward III; and in 1642 a naval engagement took place on Lough Neagh, for Viscount Massereene and Ferrard (who founded Antrim Castle in 1662) had a right to maintain a fighting fleet on the lough.

    The Society of United Irishmen launched a rebellion in 1798, which began in Leinster and quickly spread to Ulster. The United Irishmen had been founded in 1791 by liberal Protestants in Belfast. Its goal was to unite Catholics and Protestants and to end British monarchical rule over Ireland and to found a sovereign, independent Irish republic. Although its membership was mainly Catholic, many of its leaders and members in northeast Ulster were Protestant Presbyterians. On 7 June 1798, about 4000 United Irishmen led by Henry Joy McCracken attacked the town. The rebels were on the verge of taking the town until British reinforcements arrived. Thanks to a rebel band led by James Hope, most of the United Irishmen were able to withdraw safely. This is known as the Battle of Antrim.

    Before the Act of Union, Antrim returned two members to parliament by virtue of letters patent granted in 1666 by Charles II.